Review: The Story of Christian Theology

The Story of Christian Theology Roger E. Olson If you’ve ever wondered how the major pieces of Christian theology –things like the Trinity, Predestination, and Baptism– you will find them here. Dr. Olson, a historian by trade, takes on the places, times, and movements that developed and hardened the Christian doctrines we know today. Essentially, this book […] […]

It's Your Nature (Unconditional Election)

One of the prime accusations against Calvinism is that if man is predestined to salvation or damnation (unconditionally elected, saved by irresistible grace, against man’s total depravity), then man is not free to choose –or rather, man has no free will. The Calvinistic response is: What does it mean to say that I am free? It means […] […]

It’s Your Nature (Unconditional Election)

One of the prime accusations against Calvinism is that if man is predestined to salvation or damnation (unconditionally elected, saved by irresistible grace, against man’s total depravity), then man is not free to choose –or rather, man has no free will. The Calvinistic response is: What does it mean to say that I am free? It means […] […]

Fatalism and Religion

As Muslims we must believe in Al Qadr. Saying “What IF” causes one to have doubt in the decree of ALLAH and opens ones ears to the evil whipspers of Shaitan which weakens our eman. It was decreed that this situation happen–Man plans but ALLAH is the best of Planners. -Arab News (Comments) This comment on […] […]

Dr. Hesier, Predestination, and Chess

I recently ran across a video Dr. Heiser, a teacher I greatly respect in the Christian world, made to explain his view of predestination. What I find interesting is his view of predestination and free will is very close to mine —and I think he struggles in the same places to explain his real view, […] […]

Narrative 029: Jacob and Esau (1)

We continue working our way through Genesis (there’s a lot of material to cover in Genesis) with chapter 25, up to the birth of Jacob and Esau. The end of this study spends a little time talking about predestination in light of the Romans 9 passage, which relies on the birth of these two men […] […]

The Library: A Paradigm

Talking to someone the other day, I ran into an illustration of the five point Calvinistic system of thought within Christianity. The illustration went something like this: Imagine God is sitting in a library, and there are thousands of books on the shelves around Him. Each of these books represents a possible world. He looks through […] […]

The Trouble with T and P

I noticed these two quotes in a book I read recently: In John 3:24, the reference is to the attitude or disposition that a believer displays in his life. John states that a believer knows Christ abides in him by the attitude or disposition that He has given him. That attitude displays itself in obeying Christ’s […] […]

People, Places, and Things (2)

(continued) Now, as Christians, we can toss intelligence out as a definition of personhood. Self awareness certainly qualifies as a dividing line, however. While plants, at least, don’t have self awareness, humans do. Moral agency also qualifies as a dividing line; the entire point of the story of the Fall is that Eve made a moral choice. […] […]

People, Places, and Things (1)

I was recently reading a theology blog (Parchment and Pen) when I stumbled across an entry about how Romans 9 proves humans are predestined. In the strictest sense, this means humans have no free will; you cannot choose to follow Christ, God decided, long before you were born, whether or not you would. The relevant […] […]