Word Play


At first, “to discriminate” meant to choose between one of several options. More specifically, it meant to wisely choose between more than one option.

Then it came to mean to choose not to like someone else because of the color of their skin, because discrimination often meant to avoid those who were in a “lower class,” and the “higher class” was generally of one skin color.

Then it came to mean to choose not to like someone else because of their religious beliefs, or lifestyle choices, because these are often associated with culture, and culture is often associated with the color of your skin.

Then it came to mean to choose not to like someone else, just in general, because almost all dislike is based on race, religion, or culture. At least that’s the theory, whether or not it’s true.

Now to be racist, to discriminate, simply means not to be a liberal. Because we all know that liberals like everyone, and conservatives are always racist, and always discriminate against people based on their race, religion, or something else. Don’t we?

The proof is in the cartoon just above —it’s perfectly fine to fire someone because they don’t believe in evolution. It’s fine to not hire someone because they believe in Creation as described in the Scriptures. It’s okay not to hire someone because they’re conservative. It’s okay for people of one skin color to hate people of another skin color, so long as the skin colors in question are right –but change the skin colors around, and it’s not okay.

So the word “discrimination” has moved from meaning something good, to something bad (even morally wrong), to something political.

The mantra of the left is words mean just what I want them to mean, and nothing else. So long as you can control the terms of the conversation, and the definitions used in the conversation, you can control the outcome. But of course that’s the point, isn’t it? Controlling the language has always been an essential element in deception and control, starting right there in Genesis 3.

You will not surely die.

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